Pregnancy_Accompanying Conditions_Gestational diabetes, is it a threat to my baby!

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GESTATIONAL DIABETES, IS IT A THREAT TO MY BABY?!

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Women's Health

GESTATIONAL DIABETES, IS IT A THREAT TO MY BABY?!

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You may develop gestational diabetes in the second half of a pregnancy.1                                       

Gestational Diabetes is a medical condition that might occur to some women in the  second  half  of pregnancy1 usually within the  period  of  24th and  28th week 2, causing a  sudden  increase  in  the blood  sugar levels.

You can develop Gestational Diabetes during   pregnancy despite not having diabetes before. But as a result of developing Gestational Diabetes while pregnancy, you become more likely to develop type 2 diabetes in the future, if it is poorly managed; furthermore, it raises your child’s odds of developing diabetes.2

Despite having Gestational Diabetes, good diagnosis and treatment2 will help you to have a healthy pregnancy.  This can only be done through following healthy diet, and keeping close eye on blood sugar levels. Additionally, you should take oral medication to lower high glucose levels as it is necessary to keep the mother's sugar levels controlled within the normal range till the end of the pregnancy period.1, 4

Taking care of your Gestational Diabetes is important for you & your baby to avoid complications or developing type 2 diabetes at some point after pregnancy.3

References

1.                   Having a baby. NSW Health Available at  https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/kidsfamilies/MCFhealth/Publications/having-a-baby.pdf Last accessed 25/6/2019

2.                   Gestational Diabetes. Available at  https://www.healthline.com/health/gestational-diabetes Last accessed 25/6/2019

3.                   Gestational Diabetes. Planned Parenthood. Available at  https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/pregnancy/gestational-diabetes Last accessed 25/6/2019

4.                   Pregnancy Complications. Gestational Diabetes. Available at  https://www.healthline.com/health/pregnancy/complications-treatments#gestational-diabetes Last accessed 25/6/2019